DIY Ice Cream Magnets

DIY Ice Cream Magnets DIY Ice Cream Magnets Hi guys! This is Marianela from Love Vividly. I’m so excited to share this fun DIY project with you all! Who here loves ice cream?! I’m all about ice cream every day of my life. I may or may not be lactose intolerant, but I don’t let that stop me from eating one of my favorite desserts! When Holly asked me to share a DIY I had a couple of ideas in mind, but this one was by far one of my faves! Plus, now I get to cover my fridge with these adorable little ice cream bars! So get ready, because it’s actually pretty simple to make and you’ll be impressed with how it turns out (I know I was!).

DIY Ice Cream MagnetsSupplies needed:

  • Air clay
  • Needle tool
  • Wood modeling tool
  • Acrylic paints (colors of choice)
  • Paint brushes
  • Glass seed beads
  • Mini popsicle sticks
  • Hot glue gun
  • Ceramic disc magnets (found mine at Home Depot)

DIY Ice Cream Magnets DIY Ice Cream MagnetsDIY Ice Cream MagnetsDIY Ice Cream MagnetsDIY Ice Cream MagnetsHow to make your ice cream magnets:

Step 1: Using your tools, mold the clay into the shape of an ice cream bar.

Step 2: Break or cut the mini Popsicle stick(s) in half and place onto the back of the ice cream bar from step 1. Using excess clay, place the clay over the ice cream bar on top of the Popsicle stick. By doing so, this will ensure the Popsicle stick is secure to your clay.

Step 3: Let dry for 24 hours; the time may vary depending on how thick your clay is.

Step 4: Paint your ice cream bars using colors of your choice. Let dry.

Step 5: Using a different color (I chose white), paint the top half of your ice cream and give it a “dip effect” Let dry.

Step 6: Put glue onto the painted “dip effect” part from step 4 of your ice cream bar, and dip into a pile of glass seed beads. Let dry.

Step 7: Using a hot glue gun, glue a magnet onto the back of the ice cream bar, and let dry once again.

Step 8: Once everything is fully dry, your ice cream magnets are all set and ready for use!

DIY Ice Cream MagnetsI’m so happy with how these magnets turned out! They’re looking super cute on our fridge right now! Not only will these magnets spruce up your fridge or workspace, but they will also make a great gift for your BFF’s!

DIY Hand Stitched Saying Pillow

DIY Hand Stitched Saying Pillow | www.revamperate.comHey there, friends! I shared a new DIY project over on CraftPaperScissors recently! Head over to the website to see my tutorial for this DIY hand stitched saying pillow and let me know if you give it a try. 

I loved making this because I find stitching pretty relaxing, and you can customize it with your favorite quote or saying, which makes it a thoughtful gift idea. You can do this with just about any pillow cover in any size or color and customize it to fit your needs completely. Have fun with it!

Head over to CraftPaperScissors to see the full tutorial!

DIY Donut Tray

DIY Donut Tray | Revamperate DIY Donut Tray | RevamperateI feel like it’s been ages since I shared a DIY project here, so it’s about time I get back into the swing of things and share a new project. And what better time to do that than for National Donut Day tomorrow! 

Donut Day is my favorite of all the food holidays, so when I started brainstorming what to make for this beloved holiday, I landed on something that I hoped would be useful. After all, I am 100% out of space in my apartment, so I can only justify useful DIYs these days. That’s how this DIY donut tray was born!

Naturally, I will also be eating donuts this Friday, despite reminding myself I’m supposed to be “eating healthy.” I’ll make an exception, just this once…

Anyway, here’s how to make your own painted donut tray from a piece of wood and pretty drawer hardware! 

DIY Donut Tray | RevamperateTime: 30 minutes + dry time

Supplies:

  • Round wood, approx. 10 inch diameter 
  • 2 drawer handles with screws
  • Tan/light brown paint
  • Light pink paint
  • Other paint colors 
  • Variety of paintbrush sizes
  • Clear spray paint sealant 
  • Pencil
  • Drill (not required, but recommended)

First, sand the wood down if needed. I purchased mine at Michaels, so it was already smooth, but it’s actually made to be a clock, so I filled in the hole with a little putty. Using any round object as a stencil, draw a circle in the middle of the wood to show the hole in the middle of the donut. My hole measured about 3 inches. 

Next, paint the entire piece of wood (top and sides, minus the hole in the middle) a tan or light brown color. Let dry.

With the light pink paint, paint on the “frosting” about 1 inch from the edge of the wood in squiggles or waves. Leave about an inch between the donut hole and the “frosting.” If needed, use the pencil to sketch your design before painting. 

DIY Donut Tray | Revamperate DIY Donut Tray | RevamperateOnce dry, use a small paint brush to make small lines in various colors around the “frosting.” These are the sprinkles. Play around with the different angles of the lines so that they all do not face the same direction.

Spray the entire piece with a clear spray paint to seal the paint. This is recommended so that the paint does not chip off the wood. It also gives it a shine, but it’s not required.

Once completely dry, you will need to screw in the handles. About one inch from the edge, choose where you would like the first handle to go and mark the holes with a pencil. Each hole should be about an inch from the edge. Before drilling, use a ruler to measure where the opposite handle should go so that the handles are as even as possible. Mark the holes of the second handle. Lastly, drill the handles into the wood until secure. 

*Alternatively, you can use a heavy duty glue like E6000 to glue the handles but be warned it is less reliable. 

Now you have a completed donut tray for entertaining, holding donuts or drinks! In my case margaritas, which I thoroughly enjoyed drinking when they were done being used as props…

Happy National Donut Day! 

In-Post-Club-Crafted

5-Minute DIY Copper Pipe Towel Hanger

DIY Copper Pipe Towel Hanger | Revamperate DIY Copper Pipe Towel Hanger | RevamperateCan we just take a second to admire copper refrigerator pipe? I mean, it’s probably my new favorite craft supply because I can use it for so many things. It’s so pretty and shiny and easy to bend (unlike plumbing pipe). 

Today’s DIY is part of my 5-minute DIY series because, yes, it’s that easy! With some copper refrigerator pipe, you can make this cute but very simple copper pipe towel hanger for a kitchen or bathroom. To make sure the hanger moves properly when you’re using or moving the towel, I recommend using a hook instead of a nail to hang it on your wall. A nail is less stable, and the hook gives it a chance to move more freely without falling. 

DIY Copper Pipe Towel Hanger | RevamperateTime: 5 minutes

Supplies:

  • Copper refrigerator pipe
  • Pipe cutter
  • Hook
  • Tape measure

This project is really simple! Cut a piece of refrigerator pipe approximately 32 inches long. Measure about 8 inches from the end and bend a 45 degree angle. Measure another 8 inches down the pipe and bend at a 90 degree angle (this will be the top). Another 8 inches down, bend another 45 degree angle, so you should have two layers on the bottom of the hanger. This lends some stability. 

To hang the towel rack on your wall, choose your spot and carefully screw in a small hook. You shouldn’t need a drill to do this.  Then place the top bend of the pipe inside the hook, which allows it to move freely if needed. Hang your towel on the bottom portion and you’re all set. 

Easy peeasy, right? Just what I need on a Monday…Happy crafting! 

DIY Simple Dyed Rope Bowl

DIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | Revamperate DIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | RevamperateSo there’s a story here. First of all, my cats are spoiled rotten and have tons of toys that they don’t even play with because Penny would rather play with a pipe cleaner and Oliver is afraid of almost everything. This leaves me with a ton of toys that need a place to hang out, so I’ve been keeping them in a tiny bucket for a while now, which was overflowing. 

That brings me to today’s DIY, which I’m super excited about, to be honest! This simple dyed rope bowl uses regular ‘ol acrylic paint, but waters it down to give it a watercolor-looking effect. It was a really fun project and left me wanting to try this technique for other DIYs. You can do this with as many colors as you want, but you should be careful about overlapping them so that you don’t turn the paint brown. I used three similar shades of blue/teal, so when they overlapped it didn’t effect the paint. 

Now, let’s have some fun with paint!

DIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | RevamperateDIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | RevamperateTime: 20 minutes + dry time

Supplies:

  • Clothesline rope (or similar)
  • 2-3 colors of standard acrylic paint
  • Water
  • Paintbrushes
  • Cups
  • Scissors
  • Glue gun

First, cut the rope to be about 20 feet (the more the merrier). This is an estimate for making a bowl approximately 5 inches wide. I recommend laying out a large plastic bag on your work surface to lay the wet rope on to dry. 

Fill each cup with about 2 inches of water, pour several drops of paint in each one and stir well with a paintbrush until you reach your desired coloring. Watering down the paint makes it stick easily to the rope and give it a watercolor or tie dye look. 

Begin dipping several inches of rope at a time in your desired colors (I used three similar ones). I did not follow a specific pattern and allowed the colors to overlap slightly for a tie dyed appearance. I don’t recommend overlapping colors if you’re using very different colors because it could taint the paint in each cup and turn your colors brown. Some paint will settle on the bottom of the cup, so I also recommend avoiding touching the bottom with the rope. Continue until the entire rope is colored and allow to dry on the plastic bag overnight.

DIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | Revamperate DIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | RevamperateOnce completely dry, use your glue gun to create the bowl. At one end, bend the rope and glue into a spiral. Continue the pattern until it is about 4-5 inches wide. Then, instead of going outward, start gluing at an angle so that the rope begins to form upward in a bowl shape. You can either go straight up into a cylinder shape or continue outward in a standard bowl shape, but this is a little more difficult. Continue gluing until you reach your desired size and shape, and glue the very end of the rope securely to the bowl (and cut carefully since it may be frayed). 

The hot glue should dry quickly, leaving the bowl fairly stable. Fill it with whatever you’d like and enjoy!

5 Minute DIY Spray Painted Planter

DIY Spray Painted Succulent Planter | Revamperate DIY Spray Painted Succulent Planter | RevamperateIf you’ve read the blog before, you know the plants and I don’t normally get along, but I have managed to keep my succulents alive for quite a while now, which has a lot to do with keeping them away from the cats. I learned early on that Oliver liked succulents a little too much, and they were quickly torn apart if left on a low table. Even the ones on my windowsill are not entirely safe from the cats (nothing is safe!), but they’ve been doing pretty well regardless.

A couple months ago, I shared the basics for how to make a terrarium. After I made that post, I thought I’d take a second to share the 5 minutes it took to make my spray painted planter with the teal bottom. First of all, that funky little square vase cost me $3 at Michaels and I already had leftover Montana Cans spray paint from my triangle painted vase project. Win, win. I love cheap projects!  

DIY Spray Painted Succulent Planter | RevamperateTime: 5 minutes 

Supplies:

  • Clear shallow vase 
  • Bright color spray paint 
  • Trash bag or newspaper
  • Masking tape

I taped down a cut up trash bag as my base for spray painting. My neighbors must hate me for spray painting in the complex…especially when I leave marks on the pavement outside my door…There may or may not be some yellow and teal paint on the ground outside my door still. Oops…I swear it does wash away after a while though. But learn from my mistakes – always put down an extra large base when painting even small items. Spray paint travels more than you think it does! 

Wash the vase and remove any stickers. Place face down in the middle of the base and lightly spray the bottom of the glass. For something as shallow at this vase, I had to be careful not to spray too much, otherwise it wouldn’t give me the look I wanted. Since I was going for color that only sprayed about halfway up, I kept the spray paint can up high and did not spray the sides at all. Instead, I sprayed the bottom of the vase and let the paint splatter travel up the sides on its own. 

Let dry and come back later to make any necessary touch-ups. Then fill it up! 

Add your rocks, sand, soil and plants and top it off with additional rocks or other materials to finish it, and now you’ll have a cute terrarium with a bright painted bottom! Display in your home or give it away for a thoughtful gift. Mine has a perfect spot in my office, and the color matches perfectly with the brackets of our new shelves. Happy crafting! 

DIY How to Sew a Lumbar Pillow from a Placemat (or Anything Else!)

DIY Placemat Lumbar Pillow | RevamperatePillows are my favorite. Every time I go shopping somewhere, I find myself gravitating toward pillows and wishing that I had ten couches and three beds in my house to fill with pillows. BUT since I don’t, I end up being so critical and picky that I don’t buy the beautiful pillows that I lust after and only have a couple on my couch. Plus, it’s kind of crazy how expensive pillows are…or maybe I’m just that cheap? Luckily, it’s Christmastime now, so I can make pillows that are just for Christmas! It’s a perfect excuse to have MORE PILLOWS and then store them away for the rest of the year. 

So today I’m sharing how to make a lumbar pillow from a placemat (or pretty much anything else). The great thing about a pillow is you can recycle any fabric to make it, so grab a placemat, scarf, table runner, table cloth, old t-shirt, etc. and get to sewing! This is a super easy sewing project for anyone, and I like making pillows this way because you can stuff the pillows yourself and make them as full as you want. I find that pillow forms are just never as lusciously full as I would like them to be, and the cost of a giant bag of fiberfill is still cheaper than one pillow form. 

DIY Placemat Lumbar Pillow | RevamperateTime: 30 minutes 

Supplies:

  • One standard sized placemat (can also use a scarf, table runner, etc.)
  • 1/2 yard matching fabric (for backside)
  • Fiberfill pillow stuffing
  • Matching thread
  • Scissors
  • Cutting board (if you have one)
  • Needle 

I laid my eyes on this cute, simple placemat with “Merry & Bright” embroidered on it at Target and instantly knew that I could use it for something and it was only, like, $3 and I just had to have it. So that’s how I decided to turn a placemat into a Christmas pillow…because I don’t actually use placemats as placemats but I love pillows.

You can follow this tutorial to make a lumbar pillow out of pretty much anything (a scarf, table runner, recycled fabric, etc.). Your pillow can vary sizes, but I based mine on the length of the placemat, so I ended up with a pillow about 12 in x 4 in when I allowed room for seams. Plus, because I have an embroidered pattern, I wanted to make sure that portion showed up in the middle of the pillow. Whatever size you choose, just be sure to add at least 1/2 inch to your desired size to allow for seams, but know that I’m writing as if we’re all making a 12 in x 4 in pillow.

Because this placemat was double sided, I didn’t actually end up using a different fabric for the backside, but I added it in the supplies list because I had fully intended on using it at first, and it’s likely that you’ll need more fabric for the back of the pillow.

First, cut the placemat to be about 12.5 in x 4.5 in, taking into account the direction you want the pattern (or in this case, embroidery) to be in, making sure that pattern is centered. Because a placemat has a fairly thick seam around the edge, I cut that off first before cutting the rest of my measurements. 

Then cut the same size from your matching fabric for the backing. You can either use a color that stands out against your front side or that blends well with it – whatever you want! Place the two right sides (or patterned sides) together, line up the edges and pin all the way around. 

DIY Placemat Lumbar Pillow | Revamperate
Beginning at a corner along one of the long sides of the fabric, back stitch and then sew all the way around the pillow with at least a 1/4-inch seam, leaving a 3-inch hole before you reach the end of the pillow and back stitching again. Trim the threads and cut your corners. Then turn the pillowcase right side out and iron down the seams (not entirely necessary but recommended). 

Grab your pillow stuffing and push it into the corners from the opening left in the side of the pillowcase (I use a little chopstick-looking tool). Fill the pillow until you reach your desired fluffiness. 

Lastly, use a ladder stitch to close the opening with an invisible seam. Then you’re left with a cute lumbar pillow and even though you’ll know that it’s made from a placemat, no one else will ever guess it. It looks great on my chair for the season. Definitely a worthwhile Target purchase!

Christmas DIY Ombre Glitter Tree Decorations

DIY Ombre Glitter Trees | Revamperate DIY Ombre Glitter Trees | Revamperate
My first Christmas post of the season! You have no idea how excited I am for Christmas (and a couple days off), and making decorations is how I celebrate the start of the season. By Thanksgiving, my apartment was already Christmas-fied and my tree was up. I spent my Thanksgiving break making Christmas treats, ornaments and other little things I’m excited to share in the next few weeks.

Sorry to go completely cat lady on you, but I’m also incredibly excited because it’s Penny’s first Christmas! I’m sure her and Oliver will leave a path of destruction around the house, which is why I put the tree up a little early before even hanging any ornaments. I caught them climbing it several times…

DIY Ombre Glitter Trees | RevamperateTime: 25 minutes

Supplies:

  • Styrofoam trees (variety of sizes)
  • Fine glitter, 3 color variations 
  • ModPodge or similar glue
  • Paintbrush 
  • Chopsticks (optional, for drying)
  • Clear sealant spray (optional)

Choose your colors! I used three different shades of blue as well as shades of silver and white. 

Use a paintbrush to brush a layer of ModPodge on the bottom third of a tree and sprinkle with one of the glitters (I used the darkest on the bottom). Do this over paper to avoid a mess. Sprinkle on the glitter and gently tap the tree to release excess glitter. If making multiple, set aside to dry while you work on the bottom layer of another tree.

Then repeat the same process with the next layer of glitter. When you reach the top layer, you can either carefully hold the stryofoam bottom or poke something like a chopstick into the bottom to hold it. I used a chopstick in order to avoid touching the glued portion while it was still wet. Once done with the top, either set the bottom on paper to dry or place the chopstick-end in a cup to dry. Complete all of your trees and let them dry for at least an hour until the glue dries.

DIY Ombre Glitter Trees | Revamperate
If you want, you can spray the trees in a clear sealant after the glitter dries, which may prevent some of the glitter from shedding. 

Then display them and let them sparkle! Also, prepare to find glitter everywhere from now on (I’m only half kidding)…they’re a fun addition to my Christmas decor and even Andrew said he liked them, so that’s always a win in my book.

Happy holidays!

Halloween DIY Bleeding Candle Decorations

DIY Bleeding Candles for Halloween | Revamperate DIY Bleeding Candles for Halloween | RevamperateIt’s almost time for Halloween! As it gets closet and closer and closer, I think it’s fair that the Halloween projects get a little easier. After all, the earlier you have your decorations up, the longer you can enjoy them. Today’s project is a quick one that you can make in 10 minutes or less and with easy to find supplies. You might already even have the supplies in your house, making this even easier. 

These bleeding candle decorations are really easy to make as a last-minute Halloween decoration . They use two different kinds of wax to give the appearance that a regular white candle is bleeding, and when the lights are dim and the candles are lit, they look pretty creepy. I used a red candle for the “blood” instead of my own wax because it’s easier and less expensive, but if you see yourself as a more advanced candlemaker, then feel free to make your own red wax. 

DIY Bleeding Candles for Halloween | RevamperateTime: 10 minutes 

Supplies:

  • White candles
  • Red candles (or you can make your own red wax)
  • Glass pourable measuring cup

First, lay out the white candles on a piece of parchment and set aside. 

I recommend using a pourable glass measuring cup for the red wax to make sure you achieve a dripping effect on the white candles, but if you don’t have access to a pourable container, you can also just light a candle and drip the wax onto the candle or use something that doesn’t have a pourable spout. 

Place the red candles or red wax into a pot (preferably not an expensive one), and heat on medium heat. Watch carefully until the wax is completely melted and then pour the wax into your pourable measuring cup – careful not to burn yourself! 

Slowly pour the wax along the top edge of the white candles and let it drip. You can also pour straight over the top and let it drip down the sides, but it can be less predictable that way. Always start slow and remember that you can always add more wax, but you can’t remove it once it’s poured, and it dries very quickly. Continue pouring wax along the edge until you are satisfied with the look.

When all the wax has dried, carefully pull the candles from the parchment and remove any wax that has pooled at the base. Of course, you can keep the pools of wax too! That’s up to you. 

Display them on candle holders and light ’em up! They look so much better when lit, and they make a really simple but beautiful Halloween decoration.

DIY Bleeding Candles for Halloween | Revamperate

Halloween DIY Skull Candy Bowl

DIY Skull Candy Bowl for Halloween | Revamperate DIY Skull Candy Bowl for Halloween | RevamperateI was never really much of a Halloween person, but in the past year that I’ve dedicate to the blog, I’ve learned to LOVE Halloween. Christmas still totally dominates in my book, but I love decorating for Halloween, creating costumes and making themed treats. This project was one of my favs! I passed by a bunch of styrofoam skulls at Michaels and had one of those “I can make something with that” moments. I wondered what would happen if I tried to make it into a bowl, and after some fiddling and scraping at styrofoam, I’m happy to say that it worked! 

While a skull candy bowl like this one may not hold enough candy for all of your trick-or-treaters, it will look nice filled with candy on your coffee table. But beware! The bowl will be empty before you know it, as was the case with the M&Ms in this picture. Sorry, not sorry? Anyway, this is a fun project – if you enjoy stabbing at styrofoam with a knife, you’re going to love it! 

Time: 25 minutes + bake time

Supplies:

  • Styrofoam skull
  • White spray paint 
  • Polymer clay
  • White caulking tube
  • Box cutter or knife 
  • Rolling pin 

First, spray paint the styrofoam skull with a light coat of white paint. I found that when spray painting styrofoam, it’s best to spray it very lightly from at least a foot away. I was spray painting a little bit too close and it caused some bubbling in a few places, which wasn’t fatal to the project, but it’s not ideal. It just gave the styrofoam a different texture that I planned at first. 

Use a small bowl to outline the opening on the top of the skull. With a knife, box cutter, or other sharp tool, begin cutting out the top of the skull. It’ll take some hacking, but it doesn’t have to look pretty because it will be covered up with clay. 

DIY Skull Candy Bowl for Halloween | RevamperateDIY Skull Candy Bowl for Halloween | RevamperatePreheat the clay to 275 degrees (or whatever your clay requires). 

Roll out the clay with a rolling pin until it’s about 1/4 inch thick. You can either eyeball it or trace a large bowl (larger than the one used on the skull top) and cut a large circle from the clay. Begin squaring the corners and smoothing them out to make the bowl deeper. Place it inside of the skull’s hole and shape it as needed to fit the space. 

Once satisfied, bake the clay for 15 minutes until hard, and when the clay bowl has cooled, place it inside of the skull opening. It should be a tight fit. It may require some pushing or additional shaping of the hole in the skull to get the bowl to fit. With the caulking tube, squeeze caulking around the edge of the bowl and skull, smoothing it out with your finger to completely fill in the gap. Let dry completely and use a damp paper towel to wipe the clay bowl clean. 

Then fill it up with candy! It may not hold enough to feed your trick-or-treaters but it will look great filled with candy on your coffee table. Happy Halloween! 

DIY Skull Candy Bowl for Halloween | Revamperate