DIY Simple Dyed Rope Bowl

DIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | Revamperate DIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | RevamperateSo there’s a story here. First of all, my cats are spoiled rotten and have tons of toys that they don’t even play with because Penny would rather play with a pipe cleaner and Oliver is afraid of almost everything. This leaves me with a ton of toys that need a place to hang out, so I’ve been keeping them in a tiny bucket for a while now, which was overflowing. 

That brings me to today’s DIY, which I’m super excited about, to be honest! This simple dyed rope bowl uses regular ‘ol acrylic paint, but waters it down to give it a watercolor-looking effect. It was a really fun project and left me wanting to try this technique for other DIYs. You can do this with as many colors as you want, but you should be careful about overlapping them so that you don’t turn the paint brown. I used three similar shades of blue/teal, so when they overlapped it didn’t effect the paint. 

Now, let’s have some fun with paint!

DIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | RevamperateDIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | RevamperateTime: 20 minutes + dry time

Supplies:

  • Clothesline rope (or similar)
  • 2-3 colors of standard acrylic paint
  • Water
  • Paintbrushes
  • Cups
  • Scissors
  • Glue gun

First, cut the rope to be about 20 feet (the more the merrier). This is an estimate for making a bowl approximately 5 inches wide. I recommend laying out a large plastic bag on your work surface to lay the wet rope on to dry. 

Fill each cup with about 2 inches of water, pour several drops of paint in each one and stir well with a paintbrush until you reach your desired coloring. Watering down the paint makes it stick easily to the rope and give it a watercolor or tie dye look. 

Begin dipping several inches of rope at a time in your desired colors (I used three similar ones). I did not follow a specific pattern and allowed the colors to overlap slightly for a tie dyed appearance. I don’t recommend overlapping colors if you’re using very different colors because it could taint the paint in each cup and turn your colors brown. Some paint will settle on the bottom of the cup, so I also recommend avoiding touching the bottom with the rope. Continue until the entire rope is colored and allow to dry on the plastic bag overnight.

DIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | Revamperate DIY Tie Dye Rope Bowl | RevamperateOnce completely dry, use your glue gun to create the bowl. At one end, bend the rope and glue into a spiral. Continue the pattern until it is about 4-5 inches wide. Then, instead of going outward, start gluing at an angle so that the rope begins to form upward in a bowl shape. You can either go straight up into a cylinder shape or continue outward in a standard bowl shape, but this is a little more difficult. Continue gluing until you reach your desired size and shape, and glue the very end of the rope securely to the bowl (and cut carefully since it may be frayed). 

The hot glue should dry quickly, leaving the bowl fairly stable. Fill it with whatever you’d like and enjoy!

DIY Sisal Rope Basket

DIY Sisal Rope Storage Basket | Revamperate
Hey there, happy Tuesday! I hope you had a great long weekend. If you follow me on Twitter or Instagram, you might have seen my big news…I got a kitten! No words can really describe my happiness so I’ll just leave you with that. More pictures to come, of course.

Anyway, I’m being featured as a DIY Superstar over on Cut Out & Keep this week, so go check me out! They’ll be sharing one of my projects every day this week, starting with this DIY sisal rope basket. Not only is it really easy to make, the basket can actually double as a cat scratching post (oops!). It works great for housing extra blankets and pillows in my living room, and you’d never guess that it was actually made with a laundry basket. Gotta love the Dollar Store…

DIY Sisal Rope Storage Basket | Revamperate
Check out the full DIY sisal rope basket tutorial over on Cut Out & Keep, and stay tuned for several more DIYs this week!

Rope Scratching Post

DSC_0582We went a little overboard shopping for Oliver when we found out we’d be adopting him. I’m beginning to understand why parents go so crazy buying things for their kids. I spent 30 minutes just trying to decide which cat food was the best option for our little 4-month-old kitten. In the midst of our shopping, I decided that buying a $25 scratching post was just not for me. Instead, I decided to make one.

Because we have carpet in the bedrooms, I decided to go with a rope scratching post. You’re supposed to choose a type of material that isn’t in your house. For example, if you have carpet and have a carpet scratching post, your cat might think that scratching carpet is okay. We didn’t want that, but rope posts are a tad more expensive, especially for a good one.

Let me start off with a disclaimer – this is not as easy as it looks. What I expected to take me an hour took me three days to complete. Seriously. But it was worth it.

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To make this rope scratching post, you’ll need:

  • Square, tall piece of wood, approx. 2 feet tall and 4 inches thick
  • Square, thin piece of wood, approx. 1 foot across and 1 inch thick
  • Sandpaper
  • Sisal rope (medium thickness and several feet long)
  • Non-toxic wood glue (I suggest Gorilla Glue)
  • Drill
  • 4 long screws

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First, sand down the post and base with sandpaper if not already smooth. My post was pretty beat up (got it for FREE at Home Depot), so it needed quite a bit of sanding, especially around the newly cut area.

Then start gluing the end of the sisal rope at the top of the wooden post. You will slowly continue to glue down rope on each side of the post, wrapping it tightly around the pole. The reason this takes so long, particularly if you use Gorilla Glue, is because it does not dry instantly, and you have to hold it down until it’s sticky enough to stay, which can take a long time. The rope is thick and doesn’t bend and hold easily, so it needs the glue to keep it in place or it will instantly break away from the wood. Gorilla Glue is meant to set permanently after about 30 minutes. Once you have the first row glued down at the very top of the post, it gets a lot easier but is still rather time consuming. This top row will act as an anchor, making the following rows much easier to glue.

I found that doing three sides at a time was the best approach if I laid the post on its side, pushing down one side while the glue dried and gluing two more sides, laying a heavy book on top to hold down the rope while the glue dried enough to hold it in place. I’d let it set for a few minutes and do a few more sides.

It’s a lot of work, but I promise it’s worth it. The glue you choose can make all the difference, but you want to make sure it’s a non-toxic, wood-safe glue so that it won’t harm your cat if they lick the post, which is pretty likely. It also needs to be tough enough to handle constant scratching and pulling. After you have glued down the length of the post (I stopped about 4 inches short of the bottom of the post), you can begin fastening it to the base.

In order to ensure the post is sturdy, I’d recommend using four long screws to attach the post to the base – one in each corner. Position it in the middle of the square base, marking with a pencil and gluing with additional Gorilla Glue if necessary, and drill four holes into the bottom. Use the drill to screw the pieces together. They should feel very secure at this point.

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That’s all it takes. Only a few easy steps, but it can be a long project. Do it a little at a time while you work on other things, and it’ll be done in no time! So far, Oliver prefers scratching my couch, but I’m keeping my fingers crossed that he warms up to it. Overall this project only cost me about $13, and I get to say it was homemade, which is really the reason I do all of this in the first place!